Monday, December 22, 2014

Gallery: Brazil: Olympics

Chicago's Skyline

Chicago's signature is its world-famous skyscrapers, from the hulking Sears Tower and John Hancock Center to the monolithic Aon Center, which line the city's 28-mile lakefront.

PHOTO CREDIT: Erik Unger

Rio's Skyline

Rio is a vast cluster of hotels, office towers and houses wedged between the Atlantic Ocean and the mountains that frame it. Its most iconic feature is Sugarloaf, a peak rising from a peninsula at the entrance of Guanabara Bay. Accessible via cable car, it offers panoramic views of the city.

PHOTO CREDIT: Laurie Chamberlain/Corbis

Chicago's Washington Park Stadium

If Chicago wins the bid, the plan is to build a temporary stadium in Washington Park. At an estimated cost of $366 million, the 75,000-seat venue would host opening and closing ceremonies. After the games, the city will downsize the stadium to a 5,000-seat amphitheater.

PHOTO CREDIT: Photo illustration by 2016 Olympic Committee

Rio's Jo??o Havelange Olympic Stadium

Located in one of Rio's poorest neighborhoods, the 45,000-seat stadium designed by Brazilian architect Carlos Porto was completed just in time for the Pan Am Games in July, when it held many of the soccer matches. Named after a former president of the International Federation of Football Assns., it cost $200 million to build and won praise for its sleek and airy design.

PHOTO CREDIT: Erik Unger

Chicago's Olympic Village

The city plans to build its Olympic Village on 37 acres along the lakefront, just south of McCormick Place. The village, which would house 17,000 athletes, is estimated to cost $1.1 billion and would be converted to mixed-income apartments, hotels and retail space after the games.

PHOTO CREDIT: Photo illustration by 2016 Olympic Committee

Rio's Olympic Village

Set in Barra de Tijuca, one of Rio's more highly developed neighborhoods, the housing complex built for the Pan Am athletes drew rave reviews from visitors, including Mayor Richard M. Daley and Chicago 2016 Committee Chairman Patrick Ryan, who toured it in July. With a capacity of 5,500, the village is a short walk to Cidade de Deus, or "City of God," a violent slum chronicled in the 2002 film of the same name.

PHOTO CREDIT: Erik Unger

Chicago's Deep-dish Pizza

Invented at Pizzeria Uno in 1943 by owner Ike Sewell, Chicago's signature pizza is characterized by a thick, buttery, olive oil crust, a pound of cheese, thinly sliced Italian sausage and chunky tomato sauce. Two slices and you're sure to need a nap.

PHOTO CREDIT: Erik Unger

Rio's Feijoada

This black bean stew with cubed chunks of beef and pork sausage is served in the city's smallest luncheonettes, its most sophisticated hotels and everywhere in between. Spooned over white rice and topped with strips of collard greens and mandioca'a powder made from a Brazilian root'it's served with orange wedges. In the traditional recipe, every part of the pig goes into the pot, including the ears, tail and snout.

PHOTO CREDIT: Erik Unger

Chicago's Old Style Beer

This beer was first brewed by German immigrant Gottlieb Heileman in La Crosse, Wis., in 1902. But when vacationing Chicagoans brought it home, it became synonymous with Chicago's working class. Since 1950, it has been the beer of Wrigley Field.

PHOTO CREDIT: Erik Unger

Rio's Caipirinha

The Brazilian version of Mexico's margarita and Cuba's mojito, this cocktail is made by mashing a lime and two teaspoons of sugar into the bottom of a glass, then adding crushed ice and two shots of cacha??a (pronounced ka-SHA-sa)"an 80-proof Brazilian liquor made from sugar cane. The new rage in Rio is drinking it with sake or vodka instead of cacha??a and substituting lime with strawberries, kiwi or passion fruit.

PHOTO CREDIT: Erik Unger

Chicago's Blues

Hard times. Bad luck. Lost love. Such are the themes of the blues, which originated from spirituals sung by slaves. Left, the John Primer Blues Band plays at Blue Chicago on Clark Street. The blues were born in the Mississippi Delta following the Civil War. But as poor black workers moved north in search of work, the genre migrated to Chicago, where musicians added electric guitar, drums, piano and a heavy-rolling bass to the basic guitar and harmonica of the Delta blues. Famous Chicago blues musicians include Muddy Waters and Buddy Guy.

PHOTO CREDIT: Erik Unger

Rio's Samba

Like the blues, samba has its roots in slavery'Africans brought to Brazil by the Portuguese to work on sugar and coffee plantations. But samba is party music. That's apparent in districts like Lapa in downtown Rio, where club-goers swivel their hips and kick their feet to a percussion-dominated rhythm and sing along so loudly you can hardly hear the musicians.

PHOTO CREDIT: Erik Unger

Chicago's North Avenue Beach

The busiest of Chicago's 29 beaches, this section of the lakefront helps residents forget they live in the landlocked Midwest. It has more than 50 volleyball courts and a 22,000-square-foot beach house with concession stands, a lifeguard station, outdoor showers and bike rentals.

PHOTO CREDIT: Erik Unger

Rio's Copacabana Beach

No, it's not the inspiration for Barry Manilow's 1978 hit. That's about a night club in Havana. But this beach, named after a replica of the Virgin of Copacabana in Bolivia, is 2.5 miles of sand and skin. With 400,000 residents squeezed into four narrow blocks, it's also one of the most densely populated neighborhoods in the world'and a non-stop party.

PHOTO CREDIT: Erik Unger

Chicago's Sears Tower

Once the tallest in the world, the building has 110 floors and stands at 1,725 feet. With more square footage than any building in the United States besides the Pentagon, it boasts the world's highest bathrooms (on the 103rd floor skydeck) and has its own ZIP code. On a clear day, visitors can see over the plains of Illinois and across Lake Michigan to Indiana, Michigan and Wisconsin.

PHOTO CREDIT: Roger Ressmeyer/CORBIS

Rio's Christ the Redeemer

A symbol of Catholicism and the welcoming spirit of Brazilians, the "Cristos' looms over Rio from the top of Corcovado Mountain at 2,296 feet. Cristos was named one of the New Seven Wonders of the World in July in a worldwide Internet poll. Erected in 1931, the statue weighs 700 tons and can be seen from just about anywhere in Rio.

PHOTO CREDIT: Getty Images/SambaPhoto

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